Friday, September 28, 2007

IPPR Warm Words II: Encouraging Behaviour Change (PDF)

The latest publication by IPPR on climate change is just out.

A follow up to 'Warm Words' this report (Warm Words II) studies how the dialogue about climate change is changing. What are the words being used, how is the issue being framed and what are the predominant groupings (Discourses) of language, these are the questions pursued through research on UK media and broader communications materials.

The analysis has been done and the evidence presented, the main use of this for most people is objective three: What do the discourses in the public domain suggest are some considerations for an effective campaign? Good communication is difficult but at least the most obvious pitfalls can be avoided.

The overall objectives of this project were:

1. To map the public discourse of climate change in the UK, especially highlighting what has changed since the work we conducted in 2006. This meant careful mapping of the dominant frames and discourses evidenced in popular print, television, radio and online national media coverage of climate change (for example, newspaper articles/columns, government publicity, influential blogs, material from non-governmental organisations [NGOs]).

2. To look at what characterises climate change discourse at the local level – how local press, local authorities and groups engaged in climate-related activities on the ground construct and talk about the issues and their own actions.

3. To compare these sources and discourses, and suggest implications for national and local communications and activities for all those seeking to change public behaviour on climate change.

Related Post:
I invited Simon Retallack of IPPR to LSE in order to give a presentation on the first Warm Words report, i also invited Chris Rose of Campaign Strategy and Solitare Townsend of sustainable marketing company Futterra. The talks of all three and the 'Warm Words' report can be found here.


Climate Change Action

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